New stitches: Tunisian crochet in the round

I finally learned why Tunisian hooks are double ended! You can get that wonderful texture Tunisian crochet is known for, in the round.

Here’s my mini tutorial, with photos because I really struggled with the tutorial in a magazine which was written instructions only.

Start off chaining as many as you need and join with a slip stitch, as usual when crocheting in the round.

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Pull up a few loops, but make sure not to load too many onto the hook

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When you’ve pulled up some loops, slide the piece down to the opposite end of the hook

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Then flip it horizontally so you’re ready to work with the hook by the stitches

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This is for my jumper so I’m using a different coloured yarn on the return, but obviously you can use the same colour if you like.

Attach a new skein/ball at this end and start a return pass, making sure to only pull the working yarn through one loop for the first stitch and then two for all subsequent stitches

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When you finish the return pass and have one loop left on the hook, slide it to the far end again.

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Turn the hook, pick up the first working yarn (pink in this case) and start the process again.

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And then repeat until the piece is long enough!

If you need to keep track of rounds like I do for my jumper, you’ll need to place a marker in the first stitch and move it up as you go

It took me a while to get the tenson consistent all the way around, but like most things it just takes practice. I found it helps to hold the non-active yarn in my right hand rather than just leaving it hanging.

So there you have it. Has anyone else tried Tunisian in the round? Got any more tips to share? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

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FO Friday 23.03.18

It’s done, it’s finally finished! At last I can cross the chevron blanket off my WIP list.

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Blue and white chevron blanket

 

Yes, the ends need sewing in. Details.

I love my blankets with alternating BLO and regular stitch sections, but I think it worked better with the super chunky yarn I used for my massive chevron blanket.

Either way, it’s done and as soon as I get the ends sewn in this is going to my local cat shelter.

I also whipped up a wee birthday present for my dad, who loves hedgehogs.

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It’s just shorter than the palm of my hand, really dinky and cute!

And look at the clever little bobble stitch feet.

I used this pattern for the body, modified to BLO to leave the front loops free for the spines. And this one for the spines (I don’t have any eyelash yarn) with three chains rather than four. I just can’t leave a pattern alone!

It’s so cute, I might have to make another one for myself.

A productive week all in all, so I’m happy. How’s your week been? Finished anything crafty? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

xXx

New stitches: hairpin lace crochet 

I have Tami to thank for this particular stitch-learning. I saw her post about it, and the beautiful things that can be made with it, and I pretty much knew I’d be getting a loom one day.

So when I saw Crochet Now sitting on a shelf in Morrisons with a free hairpin loom, I was completely unable to resist! It just jumped into my trolley and I had to buy it. 

I tried to be good and read through the instructions first, but that’s really not the way my mind works. I got terribly confused trying to imagine exactly what I was supposed to do with it, and it made very little sense, so I just set up and jumped right in.

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It was both easier and more difficult than I expected: easier because it’s just chains and single crochet, which I already knew, with some wrapping round the frame added in. More difficult because I’m positive you need at least 3 hands to work it properly.

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How do you stop this happening every 5 seconds??

 

For my first attempt I produced this lovely lace:

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I’m not sure if you can see from the photo just how varied the loop sizes are, but you can definitely see that it’s not a straight line. My hope is that this is just a beginner thing – even after 3 years of crocheting my tension still goes very tight when I’m thinking too much about what I’m doing. Now I’ve got the general idea I think my next piece should come out much more even.

So that’s hairpin crochet! Aside from having to reattach the frame every time I move, it’s really fun and I’m looking forward to making something beautiful with it.

What do you think of hairpin crochet? Fancy giving it a go? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

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