New stitches: Tunisian crochet in the round

I finally learned why Tunisian hooks are double ended! You can get that wonderful texture Tunisian crochet is known for, in the round.

Here’s my mini tutorial, with photos because I really struggled with the tutorial in a magazine which was written instructions only.

Start off chaining as many as you need and join with a slip stitch, as usual when crocheting in the round.

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Pull up a few loops, but make sure not to load too many onto the hook

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When you’ve pulled up some loops, slide the piece down to the opposite end of the hook

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Then flip it horizontally so you’re ready to work with the hook by the stitches

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This is for my jumper so I’m using a different coloured yarn on the return, but obviously you can use the same colour if you like.

Attach a new skein/ball at this end and start a return pass, making sure to only pull the working yarn through one loop for the first stitch and then two for all subsequent stitches

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When you finish the return pass and have one loop left on the hook, slide it to the far end again.

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Turn the hook, pick up the first working yarn (pink in this case) and start the process again.

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And then repeat until the piece is long enough!

If you need to keep track of rounds like I do for my jumper, you’ll need to place a marker in the first stitch and move it up as you go

It took me a while to get the tenson consistent all the way around, but like most things it just takes practice. I found it helps to hold the non-active yarn in my right hand rather than just leaving it hanging.

So there you have it. Has anyone else tried Tunisian in the round? Got any more tips to share? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

xXx

FO Friday 24.11.17

There are even more finished hats this week! I’ve lost track of which ones I’ve shown off and which I haven’t, so here’s a photo of all of them:

Can we talk about how different the colours look close-up compared to that group shot?

I seriously need to get a proper camera.

Anyway. I do know I haven’t shown you this one because I made it last Saturday, and I can tell you now I’m never ever making a hat with this yarn again.

Stitch definition? What’s that? Never met her.

Honestly this thing will probably just fall apart one day because sewing in the ends properly was impossible. I’ve no idea if they went under/over/through any stitches at all because even up close, in really good light, all I can see is fuzz.

I also have some non-hat FOs. Remember the snowflake book my mum sent me? I decided I want to make them all to see which I like best, which isn’t actually as huge a task as I first thought.

So far they’ve all been only 3 or 4 rounds, and the most complex one took me just 15 minutes.

These are my finished snowflakes so far:

The different threads seem to give me slightly different sizes, with the silver sparkle being the biggest.

When they’re all finished I’m going to make some of them into ornaments to hang on a tree, and some into very dainty garlands.

I think some designs would also work well as coasters if I make them with thicker yarn. I’m definitely going to have a go.

Any more suggestions for ways to use 100 tiny snowflakes? Got any FOs to share? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

xXx

FO Friday 10.11.17

A thought occurs (don’t worry, I’m sitting down) – I don’t think I showed you the finished doily I was working on, did I?

Here you go!

This was a commission from a friend at choir who saw me crocheting my star blanket during rehearsals. He asked for something similar to go on his television unit, gave me some vague ideas about colours, and let me get on with in my own time.

The one issue I had is that his TV unit is rectangular, and he didn’t want the doily hanging over the edges, so a circular star blanket pattern wasn’t going to work. I did have a faff around with Google trying to find some patterns for oval doilies, but it only seemed to give me charts (which I couldn’t read at the time) or photos.

So instead I took the star blanket pattern and tweaked it a bit.

It kind of worked, but in hindsight I should have gone even further and made the beginning longer and thinner. I had to do some wizardry with singles and trebles towards the end because I realised if I kept going with double crochet all round, it would have been too long.

I sent him a photo and told him the price and he was happy with both, hooray! So now all that’s left to do is hand it over and get the money. My favourite part 😉

How’s everyone’s week been? Got any FOs to share? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

xXx

New stitches: Love knot

Okay, I’m in love.

I have to thank  Claire from Once Upon A Yarn for introducing me to this stitch. She said it was beautiful with certain yarn, and she was right!

There was the usual learning curve, of course. On my first try I struggled to get each extended chain stitch the same length, and ended up with this very lumpy foundation row:

 

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I frogged and tried again. This time I managed to get most of the foundation row the same size, but my next rows got progressively bigger and ended up stretching the foundation row.

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More frogging. My third attempt did work and I got a few rows in…

before realising that this beautiful spangly Soukie is actually not the ‘right’ yarn for love knots. It looked stringy and a bit scrappy, which I was really not expecting from such lovely yarn, and the sequins kept catching so it was difficult to get the stitches the same length. So I frogged the lot and chose another skein from my birthday stash.

Enter Lily Sugar ‘n’ Cream in Batik Ombre. Now this is the right yarn for the job. Suddenly the love knot made sense and I whizzed through, whacking out 10 rows in around half an hour. I mean, it helps that it’s 60% gaps. You’ve got to love a stitch that lets you make something up so quickly.

Plus, just look at it:

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Unrelated to the love knot; I adore this yarn. The solid colours are gorgeous all by themselves, but the transitions from one shade to the next are equally beautiful. I find myself wishing the colours would take just a bit longer to change so I can enjoy the intermediate shades some more.

So this is my first attempt to make something more spring/summery for the shop, as stocking nothing but winter hats and scarves will probably not get me very far for the rest of the year. It’s going to be a light, lacy scarf, which I think will look FABULOUS. But then, I am a little biased.

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What do you think of the Love knot? Do you like my scarf too? Let me know in the comments!

Hannah

xXx